Chimneys

a georgian chimney

The chimney is an essential component of a traditional building serving as a conduit of warmth and air but if neglected, access for moisture and the problems associated with it.

In a state of near collapse. Following close inspection, it was found to have been pointed in hard cement mortar and had been flaunched badly again using cement. This had cracked and split and had in fact worked loose from the top of the chimney allowing moisture to enter. The chimney was rebuilt from the base using Natural Hydraulic Lime (NHL) 3.5, pargetted inside using a mortar of lime, aggreagate, vermiculite, the original pots repositioned and then flaunched using (NHL) 5 mortar.  The flaunching is layered over brick pieces bedded underneath which will reduce the thickness of the mortar and reduce risk of the lime cracking. Damping down at all stages both during and after the operation is crucial for durable lime mortar repairs and so work should be covered during the project, as well as part of the mothering process carried out when it has been completed.

‘As an architect, I am always looking out for specialist craftsmen and women who will go that extra mile to work in the spirit of the period in which the fabric of the building was put together; Terrence Lee is such a person. He understands that alchemy which existed between the correct use of materials and fitness for purpose, executing his craft with a sculptor’s sensitivity and precision. He brings a huge resource of knowledge and artistry to his metier as well as an insightful analysis of the history and development of each building’. I cannot recommend him highly enough.

Maggie Baynes, Bodfach Hall

Architect, BA Dip Arch ARCUK

a late 19th century chimney

This Victorian chimney was in a very poor condition, in fact the top was close to collapse. Water was entering the property causing severe damp inside. The chimney was stripped down to the base and rebuilt using matching brick and lime mortar. Appropriate cowls are added to prevent birds and rain from entering. The shaft of the chimney was built using NHL 3.5 lime mortar and the fillets and flaunching NHL 5.

A GEORGIAN CHIMNEY WITH C20 ALTERATIONS

This chimney in Shropshire  comprised of a structure dating to the late 17th Century with a modern section at the top (the lighter coloured brick) added when the number of flues was reduced from three to two. It was in a very poor state having lost most of its jointing mortar and had been repaired extensively with modern cement. The shoulders of the chimney (the sloping sections) were rotten with damp which had percolated in to the house over many years.

After careful assessment and inspection, it was decided that the modern section should remain. The chimney was repaired over three scaffold lifts. First the vegetation was removed, the shoulders were rebuilt using as much of the original brick as possible & then flashed in lead.

‘As the new owners of a large converted Victorian former Methodist Chapel, we knew that it was in need of some extensive restoration work, particularly repointing work which in places required rebuilding.
‘After considering quotes from a number of people we found Terrence Lee, and we have been delighted with his work. His technical abilities are amply matched by his courtesy and clear communication. He let us know at every stage exactly what needed to be done, when and how it would be done, and how much it would cost. He then did the work superbly. He combined plain English with highly skilled work which was fully sensitive to the building’s needs, and at competitive prices. We could not have asked for more’.

Charles Eastwood & Ian Rayer-Smith

Whixal, Shropshire

Projects

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